We have said time and time again that the animal world contains an immeasurable amount of animals.

However, did you know that an estimated 80% of all life can be found underneath the water surface? 99% of the living space in the whole world is contained in oceans!

Furthermore, the majority of this living space in the oceans is considered the ‘’deep sea’’, deep underneath the ocean.

This part of the oceans is really hard to explore, and therefore most of the species that live in those parts are unknown to us.

Nonetheless, this doesn’t stop scientists from trying to gather info on the inhabitants of the deep sea. Luckily, they have managed to snap a few photos of some sea creatures, and some of them have never been photographed before!

All these pictures are shown in New York, as part of the National Ocean Exploration Forum.

They were taken during an exploration of the Mariana Trench, near Guam.


One of the creatures caught on camera was the vampire squid. This squid is known to scientists however there are only a few photos of it swimming in the ocean. That makes this particular photograph all the more valuable. What makes this squid special is its ability to live in sea depth where the oxygen levels are really low. Only a few other animals possess this ability, and the vampire squid is the only squid that has it.

This June 27, 2014 photo made available by the Ocean Exploration Trust shows a vampire squid (Vampyroteuthis infernalis), a deep-sea cephalopod, during an overnight dive in the Gulf of Mexico. Its name comes from its deep color and red eyes, not because it feeds on blood. (ECOGIG/Nautilus Live/Ocean Exploration Trust via AP)

This June 27, 2014 photo made available by the Ocean Exploration Trust shows a vampire squid (Vampyroteuthis infernalis), a deep-sea cephalopod, during an overnight dive in the Gulf of Mexico. Its name comes from its deep color and red eyes, not because it feeds on blood. (ECOGIG/Nautilus Live/Ocean Exploration Trust via AP)


Another deep sea animal that has been pictured is the cutthroat eel. This type of eel lives in really deep waters, up to 1.9 miles deep!

This June 27, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows a cutthroat eel at 3,145 meters (1.9 miles) deep on Stegasaurus Ridge, during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. The eels are abundant in the deep ocean and active day and night. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)

This June 27, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows a cutthroat eel at 3,145 meters (1.9 miles) deep on Stegasaurus Ridge, during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. The eels are abundant in the deep ocean and active day and night. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)


Another eel, pictured at Marianas Trench, was even thought to be a completely new species! This particular eel looks quite weird, having a bulbous head and a mouth low on its head.

This June 29, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows a cusk eel with an unusual bulbous head shape with small eyes, large nostrils, and a mouth placed low on the head, during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Researchers believe this could be a new species. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)

This June 29, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows a cusk eel with an unusual bulbous head shape with small eyes, large nostrils, and a mouth placed low on the head, during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Researchers believe this could be a new species. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)


One of the most interesting photos was that of a fish that had never been seen before! It is part of the family Aphyonidae and it is completely white, almost translucent!

This June 30, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows a fish, of the family Aphyonidae, which had never before been seen alive, during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Dives in the expedition ranged from 250 to 6,000 meters (820 feet to 3.7 miles) deep. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)

This June 30, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows a fish, of the family Aphyonidae, which had never before been seen alive, during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Dives in the expedition ranged from 250 to 6,000 meters (820 feet to 3.7 miles) deep. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)


Also, a deep sea angler fish was photographed living between the rocks. This type of fish is a known predator that ambushes its prey after patiently waiting for it to come close.

This April 30, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows a deep sea anglerfish living between pillow basalt rock formations, during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. The ambush predator waits for prey to be attracted by its lure, located between its eyes, and gulps it with its large mouth. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)

This April 30, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows a deep sea anglerfish living between pillow basalt rock formations, during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. The ambush predator waits for prey to be attracted by its lure, located between its eyes, and gulps it with its large mouth. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)


Just like most deep sea explorations, this one also managed to find a jellyfish! The one pictured is quite small, and it is bioluminescent (this means it emits light and it glows in the dark). This jellyfish is yellow and a few vertical red stripes, and it glows faintly in the picture.

This April 24, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows a bioluminescent jellyfish during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Dives in the expedition ranged from 250 to 6,000 meters (820 feet to 3.7 miles) deep. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)

This April 24, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows a bioluminescent jellyfish during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Dives in the expedition ranged from 250 to 6,000 meters (820 feet to 3.7 miles) deep. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)


There was also another interesting discovery, however it wasn’t an animal. A wreckage of a World War II plane was also pictured. Several B-29 bomber planes were lost in this particular area during the war, and in this exploration one plane was found!

This July 9, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows the remote operated vehicle Deep Discoverer examining the wreckage of a B-29 Superfortress bomber plane upside-down on the seafloor during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Over a dozen American B-29s were lost in the area during World War II. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)

This July 9, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows the remote operated vehicle Deep Discoverer examining the wreckage of a B-29 Superfortress bomber plane upside-down on the seafloor during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Over a dozen American B-29s were lost in the area during World War II. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)


Like we previously mentioned, most of the see hasn’t been explored, and there are undoubtedly many animal species that are yet to be discovered. That’s not all, even pieces of history can be found in the deep sea, like with the World War II planes. All in all, this expedition managed to gather some valuable info and snap some excellent pictures, and we are more than happy to share the discoveries.

Enjoy the gallery!


This June 30, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows a squid as the remote operated vehicle Deep Discoverer descends to the seafloor of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Dives in the expedition ranged from 250 to 6,000 meters (820 feet to 3.7 miles) deep. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)

This June 30, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows a squid as the remote operated vehicle Deep Discoverer descends to the seafloor of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Dives in the expedition ranged from 250 to 6,000 meters (820 feet to 3.7 miles) deep. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)


This April 29, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows the feeding arms of a stalked crinoid animal during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Dives in the expedition ranged from 250 to 6,000 meters (820 feet to 3.7 miles) deep. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)

This April 29, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows the feeding arms of a stalked crinoid animal during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Dives in the expedition ranged from 250 to 6,000 meters (820 feet to 3.7 miles) deep. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)


This June 30, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows an acorn worm on the "Twin Peaks" underwater formation during an exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Dives in the expedition ranged from 250 to 6,000 meters (820 feet to 3.7 miles) deep. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)

This June 30, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows an acorn worm on the “Twin Peaks” underwater formation during an exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Dives in the expedition ranged from 250 to 6,000 meters (820 feet to 3.7 miles) deep. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)


This April 26, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows a predatory tunicate, an invertebrate animal, during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Dives in the expedition ranged from 250 to 6,000 meters (820 feet to 3.7 miles) deep. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)

This April 26, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows a predatory tunicate, an invertebrate animal, during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Dives in the expedition ranged from 250 to 6,000 meters (820 feet to 3.7 miles) deep. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)


This May 4, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows a parapagurid hermit crab hosting an anemone which secretes a "shell" for the crab, during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Hermit crabs usually use a snail or other shell as protection. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)

This May 4, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows a parapagurid hermit crab hosting an anemone which secretes a “shell” for the crab, during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Hermit crabs usually use a snail or other shell as protection. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)


This June 22, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows a benthic comb jelly fish at the Ahyi Seamount, during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Dives in the expedition ranged from 250 to 6,000 meters (820 feet to 3.7 miles) deep. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)

This June 22, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows a benthic comb jelly fish at the Ahyi Seamount, during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Dives in the expedition ranged from 250 to 6,000 meters (820 feet to 3.7 miles) deep. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)


In this July 2016 image made available by the Ocean Exploration Trust, a crab, bottom, stands near an unidentified purple orb during a deep sea expedition around the Channel Islands off the coast of California. After sampling, it began to unfold to reveal two distinct lobes; researchers thing it may be a pleurobranch sea slug, a close relation to the nudibranch, but currently, none of the known species of California deep-sea pleurobranchs are purple. (Nautilus Live/Ocean Exploration Trust via AP)

In this July 2016 image made available by the Ocean Exploration Trust, a crab, bottom, stands near an unidentified purple orb during a deep sea expedition around the Channel Islands off the coast of California. After sampling, it began to unfold to reveal two distinct lobes; researchers thing it may be a pleurobranch sea slug, a close relation to the nudibranch, but currently, none of the known species of California deep-sea pleurobranchs are purple. (Nautilus Live/Ocean Exploration Trust via AP)


This April 30, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows a large blind lobster popping its head out of a hole during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Dives in the expedition ranged from 250 to 6,000 meters (820 feet to 3.7 miles) deep. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)

This April 30, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows a large blind lobster popping its head out of a hole during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Dives in the expedition ranged from 250 to 6,000 meters (820 feet to 3.7 miles) deep. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)


This April 28, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows the remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer surveying a 14-meter (46-foot) hydrothermal chimney during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Dives in the expedition ranged from 250 to 6,000 meters (820 feet to 3.7 miles) deep. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)

This April 28, 2016 image made available by NOAA shows the remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer surveying a 14-meter (46-foot) hydrothermal chimney during a deepwater exploration of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument area in the Pacific Ocean near Guam and Saipan. Dives in the expedition ranged from 250 to 6,000 meters (820 feet to 3.7 miles) deep. (NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research via AP)


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